Fire & Emergency Services

Bachelor of Applied Business in Emergency Services - Courses

CAMPUS Online Course
ACCREDITATION Applied Degree
Modules are generally worth one credit and run in 3-week blocks.
 
You should expect to spend 7 to 10 hours per week online to complete the requirements.
 
Each course description also includes the required textbook details or if readings are supplied.
 
Textbook covers with the title, authors and edition are also listed at the bottom of the page.
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REQUIRED CORE MODULES CREDITS
BES 301-3 OH&S Programs Development and Organization 1
Provides broad overview of current practices and terminology in Occupational Health & Safety, including factors that promote a safety culture, using driving forces as leverage to implement a better safety program, legislation regarding OH&S training, safety audits and components of Safety Management System.
 
Textbook: Readings are supplied in the course module
BES 325-1 Ethics for Emergency Services Managers 1
Provides overview of basic ethics concepts, including students’ personal view of ethics and ethical dilemmas related to their area of emergency services. Discuss interpretation of 4 ethical principles and other ethical principles in relation to work and personal life. Prerequisites: BES 344-1, BES 355-1, BES 370-2 & BES 370-3.
Textbooks:
  1. Langton, N., Robbins S.P., & Judge, T.A. (2016) Organizational Behaviour: Concepts, Controversies, Applications (7th Cdn. Ed.) Toronto: Pearson
  2. Robbins, S. P., Coulter, M., Leach, E., & Kilfoil, M. (2016) Management. (11th Cdn. Ed) Toronto: Pearson
BES 330-1 Statistics for Administrators 1
Provides overview of basic statistical concepts, methods used for tabular or graphic presentation of data and numerical data interpretation for decision-making. Learn introductory approaches/techniques in probability.
 
Textbook: Readings are supplied in the course module
BES 340-1 Accounting Principles 1
Introduction to some basic concepts in accounting, and applies concepts and principles required to prepare financial statements. Topics include goals and uses of accounting, general accounting principles, function of accounting equation and preparation of financial statements.
 
Textbook: Horngren, C.T. et al (2017) Accounting, Vol I. (10th Cdn. Ed.). Toronto: Pearson-Prentice Hall
BES 340-2 Financial Statement Analysis 1
Complete accounting cycle by covering topics including preparation of financial statements, completion of closing process, use of internal control and examination of tools of financial statement analysis. Introduces application of analytical tools to examine financial statements and related data for making informed business decisions. Prerequisite: BES 340-1.
 
Textbooks:
  1. Horngren, C.T. et al (2017) Accounting, Vol I. (10th Cdn. Ed.). Toronto: Pearson-Prentice Hall
  2. Horngren, C.T. et al (2017) Accounting, Vol II. (10th Cdn. Ed.). Toronto: Pearson-Prentice Hall
BES 340-3 Capital Budgeting 2
Introduction to basic concepts and methods related to format and calculation of cash flow statements. Topics covered include: expenditure allocation, authorization and monitoring process. Discuss capital budgeting, particularly methods of analyzing alternative long-term investments and solving capital budgeting problems by applying relevant methods and techniques. Prerequisites: BES 340-1 & BES 340-2.
 
Textbooks:
  1. Horngren, C.T. et al (2017) Accounting, Vol II. (10th Cdn. Ed.). Toronto: Pearson-Prentice Hall
  2. Braun, K. W., et al (2018) Managerial Accounting. (3rd Cdn. Ed.). Toronto: Pearson
BES 341-1* Interpersonal Communications 1
Re-introduces principles, theories, models and terminology of communication process. Topics include discerning communication styles of others and factors that influence this perception. Cover causes of workplace conflict, strategies and techniques to employ for improved communication conflict resolution.
 
Textbooks:
  1. Beebe S.A. et al (2015) Interpersonal Communication: Relating to Others  (6th Cdn. Ed.) Toronto: Pearson
  2. Langton, N., Robbins S.P., & Judge, T.A. (2017) Organizational Behaviour: Concepts, Controversies, and Applications  (7th Cdn. Ed.) Toronto: Pearson
  3. Robbins, S. P., Coulter, M., Leach, E., & Kilfoil, M. (2016) Management (11th Cdn. Ed) Toronto: Pearson

BES 341-2* Crisis Communications 2
 Focus on specific type of workplace communication - crisis communications. Identify principles that need to be in place to ensure stakeholders have accurate information and public trust is maintained, and provides information used in development of crisis communications plan (CCP). Prerequisite: BES 341-1.

Textbook:
DiSanza, J.R. & Legge, N.J. (2017) Business and Professional Communication: Plans Processes and Performance (6th Cdn). Ed.
BES 344-1* Human Resource Management 1
Introduction to relationship between human resources and strategic management of an organization. Topics include fundamental Human Resource Management techniques, management development approaches and performance strategies. Provides opportunity to develop sensitivity to organizational life and effective personnel decision-making skills at managerial level.
 
Textbook: Dessler, G., Chhinzer, N., and Cole, N. D. (2015) Management of Human Resources: The Essentials (4th Cdn. Ed.). Toronto: Pearson Prentice Hall
BES 355-1 Emergency Services Management 1
Looks at management competencies and skills required in organizational settings, in terms of various theories and models, and how such skills can be applied to improve management effectiveness. Case studies and exercises drawn from real life are used to illustrate principles. Examines functions of management within organizations by reflecting on management competencies, use of reward systems in the motivation of staff behaviour and change management. Examines management competencies by ranking them in relation to the relevance and applicability to workplace management of specific sectors. Analyze environment within which organizations operate and explore the implementation of change and conduct case study drawn from real life.
 
Textbook: Robbins, S. P., Coulter, M., Leach, E., & Kilfoil, M. (2016) Management. (11th Cdn. Ed) Toronto: Pearson
BES 355-2* Emergency Services Administration Planning & Policy 1
Introduces processes required to efficiently and effectively develop an action plan to deal with issues in emergency services administration planning and policy. Network in groups to plan, discuss, review and complete the final project, and share experiences in networking and collaborative working experience. Prerequisites: BES 344-1, BES 355-1, BES 370-2 & BES 370-3.
 
Textbooks:
  1. Dessler, G., Chhinzer, N., and Cole, N. D. (2015) Management of Human Resources: The Essentials (4th Cdn. Ed.). Toronto: Pearson Prentice Hall
  2. Robbins, S. P., Coulter, M., Leach, E., & Kilfoil, M. (2016) Management  (11th Cdn. Ed) Toronto: Pearson
  3. Langton, N., Robbins S.P., & Judge, T.A. (2016) Organizational Behaviour: Concepts, Controversies, Applications  (7th Cdn. Ed.) Toronto: Pearson
BES 356-1 Strategic Business Planning 2
Provides overview of business planning function, beginning with objectives in a strategic business plan. Analyze organization’s strengths and limitations in providing services and trends their organizations may face, and identify corresponding strategies and develop strategic business plans. Prerequisites: BES 340-1, BES 340-2 & BES 340-3.
 
Textbooks:
  1. Dessler, G., Chhinzer, N., and Cole, N. D. (2015). Management of Human Resources: The Essentials. (4th Cdn. Ed.). Toronto: Pearson Prentice Hall
  2. Robbins, S. P., Coulter, M., Leach, E., & Kilfoil, M. (2016) Management. (11th Cdn. Ed) Toronto: Pearson
BES 356-2 Resource Management 1
Overview of physical resource management with emphasis on inventories management. Topics include process, techniques and issues in inventories management in relation to specific areas of emergency services, benefits and drawbacks of keeping inventories, and study of management systems for acquiring and allocating inventories.
 
Textbook: Robbins, S. P., Coulter, M., Leach, E., & Kilfoil, M. (2016) Management. (11th Cdn. Ed) Toronto: Pearson.

 
  
BES 362 Emergency Preparedness and Response (on-site) 3
​Introduces systems approach to EMS/Fire incident management. Topics include developing an incident control plan including how to assess the incident, taking control and making operational decisions, managing resource requirements in accordance with control requirements and implementing the control plan. Prerequisites: ICS 100,  ICS 200 & BEM (Basic Emergency Management).

This course is on-site at the Emergency Training Centre on Lakeland's Vermilion campus.
 
Textbook: Readings are supplied in the course module.
BES 370-1 Performance Management and Coaching 1
Provides broad concepts of performance management and coaching including overseeing work priorities of others, identifying, addressing, reviewing, developing and maintaining personal performance issues. Explore managing staff through coaching, relation between coaching and leadership, performance reviews and modelling high standards of personal performance. Prerequisites: BES 344-1, BES 355-1, BES 370-2 & BES 370-3.
 
Textbook: Langton, N., Robbins S.P., & Judge, T.A. (2016) Organizational Behaviour: Concepts, Controversies, Applications (7th Cdn. Ed.) Toronto: Pearson
BES 370-2 Organizational Behaviour 1
Covers theory of individual behaviour, values and personality, and how elements of personality may influence organizational environment. Examine key elements related to effectiveness and organizational structure and how constructive use of conflict, politics and power, and how its relationship may affect organizational success.
 
Textbook: Langton, N., Robbins S.P., & Judge, T.A. (2016) Organizational Behaviour: Concepts, Controversies, Applications (7th Cdn. Ed.) Toronto: Pearson
  
 
BES 370-3 Team Leadership & Development 1
Examine common traits and styles of leadership, application of these competencies, leading change and how they lead effective teams and organizations. Further topics cover examination of teams, groups, and communities of practice, and look at team development issues into the future.
 
Textbooks:
  1. Robbins, S. P., Coulter, M., Leach, E., & Kilfoil, M. (2016) Management. (11th Cdn. Ed) Toronto: Pearson
  2. Langton, N., Robbins S.P., & Judge, T.A. (2016) Organizational Behaviour: Concepts, Controversies, Applications (7th Cdn. Ed.) Toronto: Pearson
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Required Courses continued CREDITS
BES 380-1* Critical Thinking 1
Intent is to improve ability to think with an overview of skills and dispositions crucial to the development and application of critical thinking. Determine importance of critical thinking on a personal, professional and global scale. Examine alternative categories of thinking that contribute to sound reasoning and comprehensive thinking skills.
BES 380-2* Reflective Thinking 1
Builds on concepts and principles introduced in BES 380-1. Continue to use critical thinking skills but focus on the skill of self-regulation and its attendant skill; metacognition. Final module of BAppBus:ES program provides an opportunity to reflect on program and cohort learning experience. Prerequisites: BES 380-1 & BES 400. All BAppBus:ES Core Modules.
BES 400* BAppBus: ES Practicum I 15
During a paid 16-week full-time practicum, students put into practice skills and competencies learned in the first half of the program. Students are an employee of an emergency service organization, and are evaluated for achieving outcomes set out in their practicum agreement. 

Note: You are expected to make your own practicum arrangements, generally with your employer. Practicum projects will be developed in consultation with a Lakeland College faculty member, your employer and you.
BES 410* BAppBus: ES Practicum II 15
To further develop skills and competencies learned in courses before and after Practicum I, students participate in a second paid 16-week practicum. Again, Students work full-time as an employee of an emergency services organization. They are evaluated based on meeting the performance outcomes in the practicum agreement.

Note: You are expected to make your own practicum arrangements, generally with your employer. Practicum projects will be developed in consultation with a Lakeland College faculty member, your employer and you.
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ELECTIVE MODULES CREDITS
BES 341-3 Public Relations/Media Skills for Managers 1
Introduction to public relations and media issues. Topics include need and how to represent and promote an organization effectively, what resources are necessary, how to motivate the public to act on public safety issues and what leadership role the individual may play in public relations. Prerequisites: BES 341-1, BES 341-2, BES 370-1 ​& BES 370-3.
BES 341-4 Critical Incident Stress Management 1
Provides broad overview of the subject of critical incident stress in emergency services workers. Examine practical application of concepts, principles, models (including CISM model) and issues related to crisis interventions and programs for the management of critical incident stress.
BES 344-2 Legal Issues in Emergency Services 1
Looks at subject matters important to emergency service members who may serve in a management capacity that deals with law. Subjects addressed are: History of the Law, Types of Law, How is Law Developed and the Canadian Court System, the Law of Tort.
BES 344-3 Labour Relations/Contract Law 1
Helps understand union relations in an emergency service organization. The course is broken into five areas for discussion and information; history of Canadian labour movement and goal of unions, structures of union, labour-management relations, the bargaining process and administering the collective agreement.
BES 355-3 Strategic Management I 1
Introduces broad topic of Strategic Management including an overview of the role and functions of strategic management in emergency services. Explore and discuss strategic, tactical and operational plans with an emphasis on developing methods for uncovering and resolving primary issues responsible for their failure. Prerequisites: BES 356-1, BES 356-2 & BES 370-1.
BES 355-4 Strategic Management II 1
This module follows BES 355-3 Strategic Management I and provides more detailed look at implementation and management phases of the strategic plan. Topics focus on monitoring, reviewing and assessing the operation, via these chosen elements, of an existing strategic plan. Prerequisite: BES 355-3.
BES 356-3 Risk Management 1
Examine concepts of risk management. Gives essential knowledge and understanding of applying risk management principles, systems, processes and tools that support a solid risk management plan. Develops a high-level understanding of emergent integrated risk management programs for emergency services. Demonstrates importance of key elements of integrated, flexible risk management approach for an all-hazards department. Shows value of a holistic approach to risk identification and management, and alignment of risk management with organization’s vision, mission, values and strategies.
BES 375-1 Future of Leadership 1
Looks at key leadership traits, competencies and skills required in Emergency Service settings. Topics include various theories and models, and skills analysis on improving organizational effectiveness. Examine various leadership theories from past and current ones to new leadership concepts for the 21st century.
Students are required to complete at least 6 of the ​above elective courses. 
 
Additional Notes:
*Transfer credit is not available for these modules. 
 
Other business administration or university transfer courses may be taken as electives at the discretion of the dean.
 

Textbooks

     
DiSanza, J.R. & Legge, N.J. (2017) Business and Professional Communication: Plans Processes and Performance (6th Cdn). Ed.
 
Required for BES 341-2
Horngren, C.T. et al (2017). Accounting, Vol I. (10th Cdn. Ed.). Toronto: Pearson-Prentice Hall
 
 
Required for BES 340-1 & BES 340-2
 Horngren, C.T. et al (2017). Accounting, Vol II. (10th Cdn. Ed.). Toronto: Pearson-Prentice Hall
 
 
Required for BES 340-2 & BES 340-3
     
Beebe S.A. et al (2015) Interpersonal Communication: Relating to Others (6th Cdn. Ed.) Toronto: Pearson
 
 
Required for BES 341-1
Robbins, S. P., Coulter, M., Leach, E., & Kilfoil, M. (2016) Management. (11th Cdn. Ed) Toronto: Pearson
 
 
Required for BES 325-1, BES 341-1, BES 355-1, BES 355-2, BES 356-1, BES 356-2 & BES 370-3
 Dessler, G., Chhinzer, N., and Cole, N. D. (2015) Management of Human Resources: The Essentials (4th Cdn. Ed.) Toronto: Pearson Prentice Hall
 
Required for BES 344-1, BES 355-2 & BES 356-1
     
Braun, K. W., et al (2018). Managerial Accounting. (3rd Cdn. Ed.). Toronto: Pearson
 
 
 
Required for BES 340-3
Langton, N., Robbins S.P., & Judge, T.A. (2016) Organizational Behaviour: Concepts, Controversies, Applications (7th Cdn. Ed.) Toronto: Pearson
 
Required for BES 325-1, BES 341-1,BES 355-2, BES 370-1 & BES 370-2
 
What Students Say
With the Student-Managed Farm you learn to be accountable for what you’re doing and the choices you make. You get an understanding of what it’s like to be out in industry or on a farm making decisions that count.

– Anthony Biglieni

Agribusiness Class of 2006

What Alumni Say
Lakeland College has been a integral partner in growing our own through the school of business. As an alumnus of the college, I have first-hand learning experience in the school of business. The professors welcome Servus Credit Union to facilitate classes in the Business Ethics course each year.

– Sandi Unruh

Senior Human Resources Consultant

What Faculty & Staff Say
Vertex has had great experience bringing on students from Lakeland College. We have found the Bachelor of Applied Science (Environmental Management) program to provide students with good academic knowledge of the environmental industry and the criteria that governs the land reclamation

– Sean Fuller B.Sc., P.Ag.

Vice President, Environmental Services, Vertex.

What Alumni Say
There is no way I would be where I am today without Lakeland College. It inspired me to be a better person and to get a job in something I love doing. I am so thankful I had such a great experience at Lakeland and I hope future students do as well.

– Danielle Gaboury

Business studies, Class of 2016.

What Students Say
I recommend the UT program to people all the time. The smaller setting Lakeland offers, is very conducive to learning. It's less intimidating than the larger universities and allows for more class interactions and discussions

– Kelly Mykytuk

2nd year UT student, 2017-18

What Alumni Say
I have loved my experience at Lakeland. The teachers are personable, and quick to share about their own experiences. They encouraged me to run with my own ideas and see what would happen; they got excited about my designs, which gave me the confidence to do my best and be more creative.

– Payton Ramstead

Class of 2016, Interior Design student.

What Alumni Say
At Lakeland College you are guaranteed to have time out of the classroom where you can put everything you learned together and actually see that what you’re learning is relevant.

– Alisa Brace

Animal Health Technology, Class of 2016.

What Alumni Say
The friendships I made, the experiences we were provided with, and the welcoming atmosphere of the Vermilion Campus made my time at Lakeland extremely valuable and memorable

– Grayden Kay

Animal Science & Agribusiness, Class of 2016.

What Alumni Say
Lakeland College was a learning environment unlike any other school. It allows students to learn beyond the classroom, and staff and faculty genuinely want to see students succeed. It’s a place where you can feel comfortable asking questions and where everyone has a place and fits in.

– Carson Reid

Agribusiness, Class of 2016.

What Alumni Say
The instructors were the highlight of my time at Lakeland. It made a huge impact on my college experience to have instructors who challenged, encouraged, and believed in me.

– Jessica Cadrain

Child & Youth Care, Class of 2016.

What Alumni Say
At the beginning of my first year, I was really stressed out as I felt I had no artistic ability. But with the instruction and time put in by the interior design faculty, I was able to develop my artistic abilities. Now I am fully confident in and exceeding well in the artistic side of this career!

– Naomi Mason

Interior Design Technology, Class of 2016.

What Alumni Say
I just feel like you get the best education at Lakeland, especially from the time that the instructors can actually spend with you. I like the class sizes too – everything’s been great about my Lakeland experience.

– Dean Coulson

Heavy Equipment Technician, Class of 2016.

What Alumni Say
I do give Lakeland College credit for reigniting my interest and even preparing me for Miss Rodeo Canada. Lakeland helped me to grow enough to have the confidence to think I could take on that role and become that person. I think that I have and I am really grateful for that

– Ali Mullin

Agribusiness, class of 2014, former Miss Rodeo Canada.

What Alumni Say
I feel the professors at Lakeland actually prepared me for the profession. It’s impossible to be just a number here when there are 12 students in all of your classes. When the school advertised small class sizes, they actually meant it.

– Stephen Mark Visser

Real Estate Appraisal and Assessment, Class of 2016.

What Alumni Say
I was involved in the president’s gala in April where I was an emcee for the evening, it was a great experience, and I had a lot of fun doing it and would recommend it to everyone.”

– Lucas Tetreault

HOPE Power Engineering, Class of 2017.

What Alumni Say
I would recommend Lakeland College for the simple fact that it's for everybody. As a mature student who went back to school much later than his 18th year, I was immediately accepted, and not ostracized in the least

– Donald James Shaw

Accounting Major, Class of 2016.

What Alumni Say
All the hands-on learning was great and very helpful once placed into the industry. Having clients leave with a smile after each service assured me that I was in the right field of work. I would recommend Lakeland to anyone.

– Courtnee Coolidge

Esthetician, Class of 2016.

What Alumni Say
The professors care so much about their students at Lakeland and are able to know each and every one of them by name, so much so that they are able to nominate a ton of students for awards.

– Stephanie Wakefeild

University Transfer, Class of 2016.

What Alumni Say
They really put you in the lead at Lakeland. Lakeland cares about its students, empowers them, and gives them opportunities to achieve their goals. I don’t see Lakeland as a stepping stone or a first step – I see it as a bridge and an integral part of my education.

– Alyssa Wells

University Transfer, Class of 2017.

What Alumni Say
I wanted to get experience in the field of assessment as it would give me exposure to what it’s like day to day. It was an invaluable experience as I find it hard to imagine what it would be like working in a particular field or area until I’m doing the work.

– Sheldon Farrell

Real estate appraisal and assessment, Class of 2017.

What Alumni Say
In the campus spa, they give you time to work with each client so nothing is rushed and you’re able to concentrate on providing the best service you can to your client.

– Daphney Couturier

Esthetician, Class of 2017.

What Alumni Say
It’s going to be a lot easier to start our first jobs having this experience and having been able to build our confidence in the campus spa. I love that we get to have this opportunity.

– Darby Watchel

Esthetician, Class of 2017.

What Employers Say
Lakeland is a great place to find employees. The college provides real world training that equips soon-to-be employees with knowledge and people skills that are highly sought after in the agriculture industry these days.

– Dustin Dinwoodie

Key Account Manager – Western Canada Arysta LifeScience